The Black Man.

Elizabeth Catlett, Sharecropper

Brittney Bullock is a Boston University graduate with a Bachelor of Arts in Philosophy. Primary interests include politics, prose and poetry. http://politicalpoppies.wordpress.com

How dare he try to be more than he was.
More than a Jim Crow Law, a gutter word walking in the street,
more than a color or an ignorant language,
more than a sex drive, a temptation for white women and their daughters,
more than home remedies for squeaky door hinges, heat rash, dry skin,
more than a back entrance to the cinema, a rusty pipe filtering a water fountain,
more than jazz hands and a good ear for audible art, perfect pitch for song,
more than shuckin’ and jivin’ and entertainin’ them white folk,
more than a strong back, a fertile womb,
more than garbage collected in Africa, to be recycled in America,
more than an underground railroad, pitching the hopeless feat- Operation Freedom,
more than scratches dug into backs like wells from a stick marking the sand,
more than gizzards and pigs feet in the pot, boiling for a midnight snack,
more than cotton-picking, warm tobacco leaves out drying in the sun,
more than a bass voice thundering through the country,
more than a foul ship’s quarters, tossing babies out to sea to rest in peace,
more than a face to hate and brand and hang from trees,
more than one acre and a mule and a hopeless prayer,
more than just another boy, even as he pushes 85 years and counting-
if you thought that’s all he was.


From the Editor:

We hope that readers receive In Parentheses as a medium through which the evolution of human thought can be appreciated, nurtured and precipitated. It will present a dynamo of artistic expression, journalism, informal analysis of our daily world, entertainment of ideas considered lofty and criticism of today’s popular culture. The featured content does not follow any specific ideology except for that of intellectual expansion of the masses.

Founded in late 2011, In Parentheses prides itself upon analysis of the current condition of intelligence in the minds of these young people, and building a hypothesis for one looming question: what comes after Post-Modernism?

The idea for this magazine stems from a simple conversation regarding the aforementioned question, which drew out the need to identify our generation’s place in literary history.

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