Winter Sacrament (Submission by R. Simpson)


Rachel Barga Simpson lives in Nashville, Tennessee with her husband and three children. She holds a bachelor’s degree in English Literature, a master’s in Speech-Language Pathology, and zero accreditations in parenthood. Her poetry is forthcoming in the spring issue of Ever Eden Literary Journal.

Winter Sacrament
The mind can be a cobwebbed corner.
It is not good for the soul to hibernate there.

In such times take a walk outside. Bring regret black and shame gray,
let them slip like ash through your fingers at a fieldside funeral.

Absolve yourself:
I cannot hold you anymore.

Keep your eyes wide for teaberry, sugar maple flame, dandelion that will not die,
wild onion climbing from impossible ground.

Press these offerings thumb to palm:
Let the earth anoint me.

Though you must excuse more elusive hues,
springtime violets and summer blues

when you return home, heart full of borrowed color,
muse that you are carrying the sky.

In Parentheses Literary Magazine (Winter 2020)

By In Parentheses in IP Volume 5

64 pages, published 1/15/2020

The Summer 2019 issue of In Parentheses Literary Magazine. Published by In Parentheses (Volume 5, Issue 3)

From the Editor:

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