BLACK LIVES MATTER at In Parentheses

[From The Editor, May 31, 2020]

In light of recent global and national events, a systemic racial inequality in the structure of capitalism, especially with regard to deadly community policing has been brought to the public eye.

Over the years we have shined a spotlight on the Black Experience through the lens of America and other parts of the World. In Parentheses has established this small sampling of our archive–news stories, images, and creativity from the submissions we have collected with the help of our blog contributors and those who support the Print Editions.

We hope to continue to add to the anthology of IP and build this invaluable resource for all of our current and future readers, in order to complete the patchwork necessary to describe the Sublimity of the Black Experience. While we have this platform we felt it was not only important to comb our archives to highlight these important stories, we must implore other creators among our readers to become contributors of written, lyrical, or visual art. Please submit to the next issue and add your unique perspective to how we tell the story of what comes after.

We have also included links below for other ways to contribute to local Black Lives Matter initiatives that will accept donations.

We are New Modernism.


In Parentheses Supports The Black Lives Matters and Racial Equality Movement

This is a crowd sourced Bail Funds / Legal Help list for various cities nationwide.

Support the Black Lives Matters movement & ongoing fight to end state-sanctioned violence, liberate Black people, and end white supremacy forever.

National Police Accountability Project – dedicated to ending the abuse of authority.

#8CANTWAIT – Police Departments that have adopted these use of force policies kill significantly fewer people. Data proves that together these eight policies can decrease police violence by 72%. Find out how to lobby for better policing in your area.

Secure Mobile-Friendly way to donate to multiple funds or allocate specific amounts to 70 individual groups.

RESOURCES FOR A BLACK LIVES MATTERS DONATION OR ACTIVISM


Credit: Phillipe M. Chatelain / In Parentheses

credit: M. Pitter / In Parentheses

Featured Creative Content

My New Friend At Pathmark
Christina Bebeau is a writer who hates red peppers and has no cats. She loves maps and running down hills. She occasionally has a small cult of people fascinated with her clothes. She lives in Washington Heights.
[Prose – May 26, 2013]

“Black Urban Myth” & “Hairitage”
Candice Ralph is a young writer, teaching artist, and nanny. She’s influenced by her discussions with children and ecological experiences. Although American born, she intimately identifies with her Bermudian and West Indian origins. Candice holds an English BA from The University of Chicago and is pursuing a Creative Writing MFA.
[Poetry – September 21, 2016]

La Vie Bohème en Bleu
Paix Robinson is a professional artist, writer and model raised in Oakland, CA, currently residing in Harlem, NY. Paix attended the Ailey School and his studies also include a major in Theatre Arts & Dance at CSULA. Paix is signed with MMG Model Management. Paix’s blog “WeerdVomit” has a readership in over 20 countries and he is the editor-in-chief and founder of artVOMIT The Magazine.
[Prose – August 11, 2016]

“Let Me Explain
Phillipe M. Chatelain is a poet from New York City with a Masters Degree in Poetry from The New School. He writes as someone in the tradition of the urban troubadour or the flaneur–wandering, taking notes. He believes that poetry of our generation has taken on a much more digital definition. Furthermore, it is important for New Modernist writers like those exhibited in In Parentheses Literary Magazine to assume the forms of media available in order to carry on the history of Sublime Art. His series taking shots alone was self-published in 2012-2015.
[Poetry – April 10, 2017]

“The Black Man”
Brittney Bullock is a Boston University graduate with a Bachelor of Arts in Philosophy. Primary interests include politics, prose and poetry.
[February 17, 2013]

Apologia”
Akhim Alexis is a writer born and raised in Trinidad and Tobago. He is currently pursuing an MA in Literatures in English at the University of the West Indies, St. Augustine. He also collects books, some which he may never read.
[Poetry – July 28, 2019]


credit: Phillipe M. Chatelain / In Parentheses

Featured Editorials

Justice Deferred: Looking At History to Make Sense of Grand Juries’ Decisions Not To Indict Policemen
Viewing these incidents as apart of an overarching socio-historical context will then equip us with a comprehensive understanding of the predicament in which young black men find themselves in this country and also an understanding of the leeway afforded to law-enforcers by judiciaries. – BY MICHAEL R. PITTER
[December 10, 2014]

Tupac Shakur and the Answer to Hughes’ Call to Black Modernism
Shakur’s rap lyrics often outshine his works of poetry, both of which elaborately describe his gangster lifestyle as well as many of the struggles he faced growing up black in America. Tupac’s poetry, however, is a one of a kind example of a black poet fulfilling Hughes’ expectations, which was greatly based on Whitmanian criteria outlined in the “Preface.” In fact, Tupac Shakur answers Langston Hughes’ call to black writers through his poetry by pointing out injustice in American and advocating for social change, as well as a change in Black self-conception, in order to bolster Black identity. – BY PHILLIPE M. CHATELAIN
[April 15, 2012]

Introducing the Black Gentrifier: An Emerging Social Anomaly
This is the basic layperson’s understanding of the gentrification framework in a few words: Twenty-something Caucasian hipsters eating Jamaican beef patties, walking through Brooklyn’s thoroughfares with sunglasses and long faces: this image could represent the most visible changes in these neighborhoods. In reality, the situation is not so black and white. by MICHAEL R. PITTER
[June 17, 2014]

“You CAN/CAN’T Touch My Hair” — Natural Hair on Display
Simply put, the “Natural Hair Movement” for Black womyn from all across the Pan-African diaspora has become our re-introduction to rocking our natural curls and naps. For many, it’s the first time since our childhood or youth (although this is not true for all naturalistas), but more critically, it is a departure from Eurocentric beauty ideals of long, straight, fine hair, an explicit embracing of our African roots (pun intended), and a celebration of ourselves. – BY RAMELCY URIBE
[June 16, 2013]

Why Modern American Racism Will Exist for Another Few Hundred Years
The murder of Michael Brown and the police intimidation and brutality that followed has pulled today’s mainstream discourse back into ascertaining how this country’s race problems could be resolved. Resolution of this historically American issue implies a sort of eradication of racism from American society. But how could this be achieved?  – BY MICHAEL R. PITTER
[August 21, 2014]

A Black Author’s Duty
Although many critics insisted that blacks be depicted positively to their misinformed public, black writers of the New Negro movement did not have an obligation to be partial towards blacks because there is literary value in any depiction of African Americans. The New Negro advancement in literature, art, and society brought about pride in African American culture and was a way of motivating African Americans to believe that they were equals because they had the newly found chance to build their social image. – BY PHILLIPE M. CHATELAIN
[June 5, 2012]


credit: M. Pitter / In Parentheses

Featured Multimedia

“Here’s To You Mr. Robinson”
To be a young black man in America with a dream is a difficult and courageous endeavor. Paix Robinson has not allowed the echoes of the global Jim Crow to dull his spirit, creative sense of being or more importantly his hustle. And his art is a vibrant reminder that harmony still exists even in the simplicity of blue, black and white. – BY TREVOR MOPPIN
[August 8, 2018]

ζ – A Selection of Photographs
Shot by Michael R. Pitter for In Parentheses
[December 20, 2014]

Bait
Historical fiction by Zuri McWhorter
[May 5, 2020]

“Directionless Clowns of the 21st Century” Off “The In Parentheses Tape” (B-Sides)
[August 21, 2012]

People of the Early 21st Century
Shot by Michael R. Pitter for In Parentheses
[December 17, 2013]


In Parentheses Supports The Black Lives Matters and Racial Equality Movement

This is a crowd sourced Bail Funds / Legal Help list for various cities nationwide.

Support the Black Lives Matters movement & ongoing fight to end state-sanctioned violence, liberate Black people, and end white supremacy forever.

National Police Accountability Project – dedicated to ending the abuse of authority.

#8CANTWAIT – Police Departments that have adopted these use of force policies kill significantly fewer people. Data proves that together these eight policies can decrease police violence by 72%. Find out how to lobby for better policing in your area.

Secure Mobile-Friendly way to donate to multiple funds or allocate specific amounts to 70 individual groups.

RESOURCES FOR A BLACK LIVES MATTERS DONATION OR ACTIVISM


From the Editor:

We hope that readers receive In Parentheses as a medium through which the evolution of human thought can be appreciated, nurtured and precipitated. It will present a dynamo of artistic expression, journalism, informal analysis of our daily world, entertainment of ideas considered lofty and criticism of today’s popular culture. The featured content does not follow any specific ideology except for that of intellectual expansion of the masses.

Founded in late 2011, In Parentheses prides itself upon analysis of the current condition of intelligence in the minds of these young people, and building a hypothesis for one looming question: what comes after Post-Modernism?

The idea for this magazine stems from a simple conversation regarding the aforementioned question, which drew out the need to identify our generation’s place in literary history.

To view the types of work we typically publish, preview or purchase our past issues.

Please join our community on Facebook, Twitter, or Instagram at @inparenth.